Photo by Haus of Zeros on Unsplash

Do the Police Believe That Legitimacy Promotes Cooperation From the Public?

Photo by Haus of Zeros on Unsplash

Do the Police Believe That Legitimacy Promotes Cooperation From the Public?

Abstract

Tyler’s process-based model of regulation suggests that when citizens perceive the police as a legitimate authority, they are more likely to cooperate in the form of reporting crimes and providing information to the police. Yet most studies have considered citizens’ perceptions of police legitimacy— few studies have asked the police what they feel makes them legitimate in the eyes of the public. Likewise, no studies have considered whether the police believe legitimacy is associated with cooperation from the public. The present study addresses this gap using data from a stratified sample of U.S. police executives. Findings suggest police believe performance, rather than procedural justice, is the key to generating cooperation from the public.

Publication
Crime & Delinquency, 63(8), 951-75
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Justin Nix
Associate Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice

My research interests include police legitimacy, procedural justice, and officer-involved shootings.